Ori In The Press

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CTV: Live Interview with Ori CEO, Hasier Larrea Ori Systems CEO, Hasier Larrea, interivewed by CTV, Canada’s #1 television network in a 2-minute interview talking about the future of urban living and how Ori can turn tiny spaces into muliptle rooms with a simple touch of a button.

CTV: Live Interview with Ori CEO, Hasier Larrea

Ori Systems CEO, Hasier Larrea, interivewed by CTV, Canada’s #1 television network in a 2-minute interview talking about the future of urban living and how Ori can turn tiny spaces into muliptle rooms with a simple touch of a button.

CNET:  Robot furniture makes one room feel like three "Alexa, ask Ori to make my bed," Ori Systems overview by Lexy Savvides, Senior Editor at CNET.

CNET:  Robot furniture makes one room feel like three

"Alexa, ask Ori to make my bed," Ori Systems overview by Lexy Savvides, Senior Editor at CNET.

 
BBC News: Ori's robotic furniture zooms across apartment A robotics start-up has created voice-controlled furniture that moves about, rearranging itself to maximize space in small apartments.Ori - a spin-off from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology - is currently pitching its products to large-scale developers.But as it explained to the BBC's Dave Lee, it hopes to eventually target individual owners of compact homes.

BBC News: Ori's robotic furniture zooms across apartment

A robotics start-up has created voice-controlled furniture that moves about, rearranging itself to maximize space in small apartments.Ori - a spin-off from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology - is currently pitching its products to large-scale developers.But as it explained to the BBC's Dave Lee, it hopes to eventually target individual owners of compact homes.

WCVB: 'Furniture with Superpowers' helping make the most out of small apartments Mike Wankum from WCVB the ABC affiliate in Boston interviews Ori Systems CEO, Hasier Larrea.  See the future of urban living, today.

WCVB: 'Furniture with Superpowers' helping make the most out of small apartments

Mike Wankum from WCVB the ABC affiliate in Boston interviews Ori Systems CEO, Hasier Larrea.  See the future of urban living, today.


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Turn a bedroom into a living room at the touch of a button

“We said, ‘Alexa, ask Ori to close the bed!’ and the bed moved into the wall unit,” Grütter said, or in Ori-speak, into living room mode. Then the living room got bigger.

 
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Transforming Tiny Apartments

Baruch Shemtov of Fox5 in NYC takes a look at the Ori Systems, which can transform a tiny apartment into a much more spacious-feeling one. (4:04 video interview)

 
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Khosla Ventures funds robotic furniture startup as it preps for national launch

Boston-based startup Ori Inc. has had one of its stylish, moveable furniture systems in the Watermark Seaport apartment complex since last summer. Now it's planning for a national launch after announcing on Wednesday a $6 million Series A led by Khosla Ventures.

 

Cramped Apartment? Try Some Transforming, Robotic FurniturE

A universally acknowledged truth about living in New York City is that there's very little space to go around. What passes for an entire apartment in Manhattan is considered a walk-in closet in Des Moines. This dearth of square footage has resulted in a couple notable phenomenons: Namely, pocket-emptying rents and some—let's just call it—creative uses of space.

 

Can robotic furniture make living in tiny apartments easier?

During a demonstration, the Ori system transformed the living room into a bedroom in less than 30 seconds, gliding on wheels over the floor until it revealed a queen-size bed that was tucked underneath. At the same time, the TV stand/entertainment unit side rolled over what had been the living room. When going into living-room mode, the Ori rolls the other way, but can also leave enough space to allow access to the closet and other storage areas.

 

Yves Béhar & MIT Designed a Shapeshifting Apartment in a Box

As apartments get smaller, traditional furniture becomes less likely to fit in—literally. As cities trend toward micro apartments in the realm of 300 square feet or under, multifunctional pieces are not just nice, but necessary to create a functional space in such a small footprint. Luckily, the geniuses at MIT Media Lab and Yves Béhar teamed up to create Ori Systems, a freestanding unit that's essentially an entire apartment in a box.

 

Ori by Yves Béhar Is the New Robotic Furniture System Poised to Transform Urban Living

"While the Ori team had the technology—actuators, electronics, and software to glide heavy furniture and connect it to other smart devices—our goal was to find a single-unit scenario that would maximize the value of a micro-studio or one-bedroom apartment," explains Béhar.

 

I would spend $10K to furnish my apartment with MIT’s robot furniture

A collaboration between Fuseproject’s Yves Béhar and MIT Media Lab, Ori Systems, comes in two sizes, “Ori Full” and “Ori Queen,” and for now, it’s only available for preorder by real estate developers, with delivery beginning toward the end of this year. The Ori Systems prototype has been tested by Airbnb guests in Boston for the past year, and model Ori Systems are currently installed in apartment complexes in 10 US and Canadian cities, including The Eugene in New York.

 

This Magical Shape-Shifting Furniture Makes Space In Tiny Apartments

Ori ― the brainchild of MIT professor Kent Larson, graduate student Hasier Larrea and designer Yves Béhar ― has been in development since 2015. Last week, the product became available for real estate developers to pre-order for their apartment buildings at a starting price of $10,000 a unit.

 

High-tech space in Quincy

“In a lot of studios, your bed takes up this much space,” said Sacks, director development for Hines, who then pressed the button again, and out from the closet came a wooden desk table. Instantly, the room went from sleeping quarters, to entertainment space, to a home office. “I call it the Murphy bed 3.0,” Sacks said with a laugh.

 

MIT’s $10K Robotic Apartment-In-A-Box Is Finally Hitting The Market 

Ori was born out of a project at MIT Media Lab, led by Ori CEO Hasier Larrea and four others. Wanting to create a compact design solution for the growing number of urban micro-apartments, the team initially produced a prototype called CityHome–essentially an early iteration of Ori that was activated by hand gestures instead of a button or app.

 

This shape-shifting furniture system transforms a tiny room into a spacious apartment

In May, the company partnered with 13 real-estate developers in 10 cities, including Boston, New York, San Francisco, and Vancouver, to bring the Ori system to select studio apartments as part of a pilot program. It expects to install 1,200 units across North America through 2018.

 

Tiny Bit Of Magic: MIT Launches Robotic Super Furniture To Fit Micro-Apartments

Affordable housing is hard to come by in many U.S. urban centers thanks to rising rents that are outpacing wage growth for working Americans. In a move to capitalize on the rise of micro-apartments, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has developed robotic furniture.

 

Ori Systems brings the robotic furniture of the future to apartments today

The product of research from MIT’s famous Media Lab, Ori launched in 2015 as a way to spin out research being conducted by MIT professor Kent Larson and graduate student Hasier Larrea.

Collaborating with the rockstar designer Yves Béhar, and building off of research that Larrea and Larson had worked on for four years, Ori’s combined bed/storage/workspace units were designed to met the needs of folks who are trying to do more in increasingly cramped urban spaces.

 

Robotic Furniture From MIT Is Making Its Way To Small Homes

In 2014, MIT engineers created CityHome, a piece of robotic furniture that at first looks like a large storage cabinet, but can transform based on the owner’s needs. Now called Ori, this design was intended to operate as an all-in-one room for compact spaces. If the owner needs to work at a desk, Ori pushes the front section forward and makes room for a chair. When the owner wants to lie down for the night, the entire section slides out in the back and brings out a bed.

 

Robot furniture wants to make your apartment feel bigger

Designed in conjunction with Yves Behar's firm FuseProject, think of the Ori as a giant cupboard that moves around on a track. Press a button and within a few seconds your bedroom space is turned into a living room as the bed slides underneath the unit. Or convert the space into a closet by moving Ori into the center of the room to expose storage space.

 

Ori Systems is Making Robotic Furniture a Reality

If you’re a fan of classic cartoons chances are you’ve seen The Jetsons, and if you haven’t you really don’t know good TV – there, I said it! The popular animated sitcom premiered in the 60s and was resurrected in the 80s, but thanks to syndication we can still enjoy the misadventures of this futuristic family even today.

 

Robotic furniture transforms tiny apartment

The pitch is well-timed. If you live in San Francisco, New York, or Vancouver, you probably don't have as much space as you want. Out here in Los Angeles, my wife and I are fretting over the imminent conversion of our son's crib into a full-fledged bed.